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Atomic Scuba Heat

Atomic Scuba Heat
Atomic Scuba Heat Atomic Scuba Heat Atomic Scuba Heat Atomic Scuba Heat

Atomic Scuba Heat ensures your second stage regulator stays protected from freezing and free flow even in extremely cold conditions. Attach Scuba Heat to your regulator to heat up the cold air from your tank before you inhale, and drastically reduce the risk of Cold Stress. Scuba Heat is the personal thermal protection device for you and your regulator.

Details
SKU 02-0500-3P
£359.00

Atomic Scuba HeatAtomic Scuba Heat is the personal thermal protection device for you and your regulator.

Scuba Heat ensures your second stage regulator stays protected from freezing and free flow even in extremely cold conditions.

Attach Scuba Heat to your regulator to heat up the cold air from your tank before you inhale, and drastically reduce the risk of Cold Stress.

HOW IT WORKS

Scuba Heat’s coil mounts onto your tank band in between your first and second stage.

As air from the first stage enters the coil, it’s instantly warmed by the surrounding water, then exits the coil toward your second stage. There are no moving parts, batteries or heating elements.

Designed to ensure your second stage regulator stays protected from freezing and free flow even in extremely cold conditions, Scuba Heat is the most innovative personal thermal protection device ever created by Atomic.

  • No moving parts
  • No batteries
  • No heating elements
  • Fits to most conventional single hose regulators
  • Protects against the harmful effects of Cold Stress

Atomic Scuba Heat

Atomic Scuba Heat

PREMIUM MATERIALS

The heat-exchanging coil is made of a special thermally conductive and corrosion-resistant copper nickel alloy that will not reduce air flow or otherwise degrade your regulator performance.

AtomicScuba Heat

IS IT REALLY THAT SIMPLE? Yes and No.

THE NO PART: The conditions that can cause a regulator to form ice and freeze up are extremely variable. The colder the water, the higher your tank pressure, the deeper you are, and the faster you breathe all work against you to chill the air and increase the risk of freezing. Deep, high exertion dives could freeze a regulator in relatively warm (50°F/10°C) water; whereas a relaxed shallow water dive might cause no problems.

It is important to understand that the ScubaHeat cannot raise the temperature of the air passing through it to a temperature greater than the surrounding water. If the surrounding water is at or very near the temperature needed to freeze freshwater, 32°(0°C), then it is possible that the air temperature at the second stage will also be low enough to begin the formation of ice. Whether or not ice will form depends on the rate of heat transfer and exposure time. You need to be aware that under these conditions you are closely approaching the limit of the effectiveness of the ScubaHeat.

THE YES PART: In spite of the limitations the ScubaHeat has as the surrounding water temperature approaches 32°F (0°C), there is significant effectiveness at water temperatures above freezing that still fall within the extreme to very cold range.

Most scuba regulators experience difficulty maintaining stability due to second stage ice formation when performing at moderate to heavy breathing rates at depth in water at and below 35°F (2°C) for even brief periods.

The ScubaHeat when coupled with an environmentally protected first stage has demonstrated it can aid the regulator to deliver satisfactory performance under these same conditions, and colder, for extended periods longer than the typical recreational dive.

For instance, the ScubaHeat has been tested in an independent laboratory in 35°F (4°C) water and demonstrated stable regulator performance at 200 feet of water (61 meters), a steady supply pressure of 3000 PSI (200 Bar) and a moderately heavy breathing rate of 62.5 liters/ minute for a duration of 30 minutes.

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